Uncategorized

Looking at Magic Formula returns, Morningstar gets all apologetic over industry performance

close

Email a Friend

Screening 2.0 and beyond

Readers of this site have learned a bit about Screening 2.0 — the ability to use Internet tools (many of them, free) to recreate portfolios that conform to the investment criteria of history’s best investors.

Validea’s John Reese has done much of the research legwork on the subject and has produced a premium product to help investors create Peter Lynch, Ken Fisher, and Ben Graham portfolios (among others).

The magic of  Greenblatt’s Magic Formulamagictrick

One source I mention frequently is Joel Greenblatt’s Magic Formula.  Greenblatt wrote about his investing magic in The Little Book that Beats the Market.  He also provides investors with a free website to screen for the top ranking stocks that fit his criteria at magicformulainvesting.com.

Morningstar takes a look at Magic Formula returns in a recent piece.  Here’s what they come up with:

We see that the formula posted approximately a 19.9% annualized return from the beginning of 1988 through Sept. 30, 2009. Over that time, the S&P 500 Index returned 9.4% annualized.

Not too shabby.

But as a frequent shill for the mutual fund industry, Morningstar feels the need to compare this market-trumping return to top performing mutual funds.  And that’s when things take an interesting turn:  The article’s author, John Coumarianos, sounds surprisingly introspective in his (near) critique of active fund management.

The market isn’t efficient, as the indexers say, but its inefficiencies are apparently not easily exploitable for some of the finest pros either–at least given how many of them currently go about investing, trying earnestly to predict future profits and discounting them back to the present. Perhaps managers outthink themselves or have too much confidence in their predictive abilities instead of relying on past results.

Why funds may perform so badly as a class

The author also cites the mutual fund structure, size, and the legacy nature of a fund portfolio — making it so easy for investors to buy and sell an already outdated model — as an impediment.  Does this mean that portfolio mirroring a la kaChing and Covestor (where investors sync their brokerage accounts up to a professional investor’s portfolio model) has another leg up on the industry?  The separately managed account model (SMA) which institutionalizes this mirroring process does have its benefits, including better tax efficiency (all stocks are held in investor’s name and cost basis is individualized) and transparency (stocks in the portfolio are held in brokerage account).

0 comments on “Looking at Magic Formula returns, Morningstar gets all apologetic over industry performance”

Events, Uncategorized

New speakers announced for Tearsheet’s Resilience Conference

  • The Resilience Conference will celebrate the people, teams and companies successfully navigating through this crisis.
  • 3 new speakers have just been announced.
Tearsheet Editors | June 25, 2020
The Customer Effect, Uncategorized

Inside Yielders, the UK’s first regulatory compliant Islamic crowdfunding platform

  • Yielders, an equity-based crowdfunding platform for real estate, is the first Shariah-compliant financial technology company to get regulatory approval in the U.K.
  • The platform's user base is 35 percent non-Muslim, some of whom may be attracted to the ethical investing principles.
Suman Bhattacharyya | May 18, 2017
Sponsored, Uncategorized

FinTech is changing your life, and you don’t even know it

Brandeis University | May 01, 2017
Uncategorized

FinTech Week: By the numbers

  • Empire Startups' inaugural FinTech Week begins today in New York
  • In preparation for 25 forthcoming events over four days, here's a breakdown by the numbers.
Tanaya Macheel | April 24, 2017
Uncategorized

Hi 5! The top five fintech stories we’re following today

  • Retailers may be looking into the future as opposed to implementing for today.
  • Banks are working to get more people comfortable using mobile apps.
Zack Miller | February 06, 2017
More Articles